Ephesus

   One of the great coastal cities ofAsia Minor (q.v.) in classical antiquity; capital of the Roman province of Asia. A flourishing seaport, as well as a center of commerce and finance, made it one of the most prosperous of the major cities along the Aegean (q.v.) coast. It was also among the most splendid in terms of its public monuments, including the long, colonnaded street with marble paving slabs that ran from the harbor to the theater. It had two famous churches, the Church of St. John, and the Church of the Virgin, the basilica (q.v.) where the Council of Ephesus (q.v.) met in 431. The so-called "Robber Council" (q.v.) met in Ephesus in 449. Around 614 the city suffered catastrophic destruction, probably by the Persians (q.v.), and/or by earthquake, from which it never fully recovered; entire areas of the city had to be abandoned, and they were never reoccupied. In the eighth century its size was still considerable enough to make it the largest city (and perhaps capital) of the theme of Thrakesion (qq.v.), and later part of the maritime theme of Samos (q.v.), perhaps indicating its role as a naval base. Its continuing commercial importance is seen in the regional fair held there in the eighth century. However, by the ninth century the harbor had silted up, and the city's population had shrunk to a settlement around the harbor, and to a strongly fortified area surrounding the Church of St. John. On this reduced scale it survived, and from about the 10th century onward it revived and prospered. In the mid-13th century it attracted the great teacher and writer Nikephoros Blemmydes (q.v.), whose pupils included George Akropolites and Theodore II Laskaris (qq.v.). In the early 14th century the city was threatened by the Catalan Grand Company, and by the Ottomans (qq.v.), who conquered it in 1304.

Historical Dictionary of Byzantium . .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ephesus — • A titular archiespiscopal see in Asia Minor, said to have been founded in the eleventh century B.C. by Androcles, son of the Athenian King Codrus, with the aid of Ionian colonists Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Ephesus     Eph …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • EPHESUS — EPHESUS, Greek city on the W. coast of Asia Minor, at the mouth of the River Cayster. Ephesus had an important Jewish community in the first century and its beginning apparently goes back to the early Hellenistic era. Information about it is… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Ephesus — Ephesus, GA U.S. town in Georgia Population (2000): 388 Housing Units (2000): 170 Land area (2000): 3.033525 sq. miles (7.856793 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.033525 sq. miles (7.856793 sq.… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Ephesus, GA — U.S. town in Georgia Population (2000): 388 Housing Units (2000): 170 Land area (2000): 3.033525 sq. miles (7.856793 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.033525 sq. miles (7.856793 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • EPHESUS — urbs Ioniae, Emporium totius Asiae citer. celeberrimum, Amazonum opus, quemadmodum et Iustin. scribit l. 2. c. 4. et Plin. retulit. l. 5. c. 29. Haec civitas loco cavo olim habitata diluvium passa est, quo cum plurimi exstincti essent, Lysimachus …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Ephesus — Ephĕsus (grch. Ephĕsos), im Altertum eine der ion. Zwölfstädte an der Westküste Kleinasiens, unweit der Mündung des Kaystros, bedeutende Handelsstadt mit berühmtem Artemistempel (Artemision, von Herostratos 356 angezündet); 431 fand das dritte… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Ephesus — Ephesus, die Hauptstadt in Ionien, im alten Griechenland, war der Sage nach von Amazonen erbaut worden. Hier stand der berühmte Tempel der Artemis (Diana) und eine große Menge von Prachtgebäuden. – Jener weltberühmte Tempel brannte 400 Jahre vor… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • Ephesus — Ephesus, uralte Stadt in Kleinasien, später durch jonische Einwanderer aus Athen unter Androklus, dem Sohne des Kodrus, besetzt, theilte die Schicksale der kleinasiatischen Griechen, war aber noch unter röm. Herrschaft eine wohlbevölkerte und… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • Ephesus — Greek city in ancient Asia Minor, center of worship for Artemis, Gk. Ephesos, traditionally derived from ephoros “overseer,” in reference to its religious significance, but this might be folk etymology …   Etymology dictionary

  • Ephesus — [ef′i səs] ancient Greek city in W Asia Minor, near what is now Izmir, Turkey: site of a large temple of Artemis ( c. 550 B.C. A.D. 260) …   English World dictionary

  • Ephesus — Infobox Settlement official name = Ephesus (Polytonic|Ἔφεσος) other name = (Efes) native name = Ancient City of Anatolia imagesize = 280px image caption = The Celsus LibraryLocation map Turkey label=Ephesus label size=100 lat=37.939722… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.